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photosynthesis

Thursday 21 May 2009

Photosynthesis is the synthesis of carbohydrates from sunlight and carbon dioxide (CO2).

In plants, cyanobacteria and algae, oxygenic photosynthesis splits water, with oxygen produced as a waste product.

This process uses the ATP and NADPH produced by the photosynthetic reaction centres, as described above, to convert CO2 into glycerate 3-phosphate, which can then be converted into glucose.

This carbon-fixation reaction is carried out by the enzyme RuBisCO as part of the Calvin – Benson cycle.

Three types of photosynthesis occur in plants, C3 carbon fixation, C4 carbon fixation and CAM photosynthesis. These differ by the route that carbon dioxide takes to the Calvin cycle, with C3 plants fixing CO2 directly, while C4 and CAM photosynthesis incorporate the CO2 into other compounds first, as adaptations to deal with intense sunlight and dry conditions.

In photosynthetic prokaryotes the mechanisms of carbon fixation are more diverse. Here, carbon dioxide can be fixed by the Calvin–Benson cycle, a reversed citric acid cycle, or the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA.

Prokaryotic chemoautotrophs also fix CO2 through the Calvin–Benson cycle, but use energy from inorganic compounds to drive the reaction.