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benign epithelial and nonepithelial inclusions

Thursday 9 August 2012

Benign epithelial and nonepithelial inclusions have been found in lymph nodes in multiple body sites.

These inclusions have been seen in cervical, axillary, mediastinal, abdominal, and pelvic lymph nodes.

They appear as benign epithelial, parathyroid, decidual, mesothelial, angiolipomatous, nevus cells, or Tamm-Horsfall protein.

Misdiagnosing benign glandular inclusions for metastasis could potentially lead to incorrect tumor staging.

Benign salivary gland tissue inclusions

Benign salivary gland tissue inclusions should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating for metastatic adenocarcinoma.

The salivary gland inclusion in pulmonary hilar lymph node may be histogenetically related to the minor salivary glands, which are located within the bronchial submucosa.