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CXCLs

Friday 4 February 2005

CXCs

Chemokines are divided into 2 major subfamilies, CXCL s and CCLs, based on the arrangement of the first 2 of the 4 conserved cysteine residues; the 2 cysteines are separated by a single amino acid in CXCLs chemokines and are adjacent in CCLs chemokines.

CXCLs chemokines are further subdivided into ELR and non-ELR types based on the presence or absence of a glu-leu-arg sequence adjacent and N terminal to the CXC motif. ELR types are chemotactic for neutrophils, while non-ELR types are chemotactic for lymphocytes.

Chemokines

Chemokines constitute a family of small (approximately 8 to 14 kD) chemotactic cytokines that direct the migration of leukocytes during inflammation and may be involved in the constitutive homing of lymphocytes into follicles and T-cell zones. They act through interactions with a subset of 7-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptors.

Chemokines are divided into 2 major subfamilies, CXCLs and CCLs, based on the arrangement of the first 2 of the 4 conserved cysteine residues; the 2 cysteines are separated by a single amino acid in CXCs chemokines and are adjacent in CCs chemokines.

CXCLs chemokines are further subdivided into ELR and non-ELR types based on the presence or absence of a glu-leu-arg sequence adjacent and N terminal to the CXCL motif. ELR types are chemotactic for neutrophils, while non-ELR types are chemotactic for lymphocytes.

Members

CXCL1 CXCL2 CXCL3 CXCL4 CXCL5 CXCL6 CXCL7 CXCL8 CXCL9 CXCL10
CXCL11 CXCL12 CXCL13

See also

- chemokines (CCLs and CXCLs)