Humpath.com - Human pathology

Home > C. Tissular pathology > hyaline change

hyaline change

Saturday 11 February 2006

  • Definition : The term "hyaline" usually refers to an alteration within cells or in the extracellular space, which gives a homogeneous, glassy, pink appearance in routine histologic sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin.

It is widely used as a descriptive histologic term rather than a specific marker for cell injury. This tinctorial change is produced by a variety of alterations and does not represent a specific pattern of accumulation.

- Intracellular accumulations of protein, described earlier (reabsorption droplets, Russell bodies, Mallory alcoholic hyalin, tumoral hyaline globules), are examples of intracellular hyaline deposits.

- Extracellular hyalin has been somewhat more difficult to analyze.

  • Collagenous fibrous tissue in old scars may appear hyalinized, but the physiochemical mechanism underlying this change is not clear.
  • In long-standing hypertension and diabetes mellitus, the walls of arterioles, especially in the kidney, become hyalinized, owing to extravasated plasma protein and deposition of basement membrane material.

Images

- Mallory bodies in alveolar pneumocytes (chemo-related lung injury)

Examples

- hyaline vessels in PLEOMORPHIC HYALINIZING ANGIECTATIC TUMOR (PHAT)

See also

- hyalinization of collagen

References

- Robbins